Metaphorical Representations and Scientific Texts

METAPHORICAL REPRESENTATIONS AND  

SCIENTIFIC TEXTS 

 

 

Amrin Saragih 

Universitas Negeri Medan 

 

 

Abstrak 

 

Metafora  tata  bahasa  merupakan  pengkodean  pengalaman  dengan  pengingkaran 

terhadap  aturan  pengkodean  yang  lazim.  Tujuan  pemakaian  metafora  adalah 

memadatkan  arti  dan  membendakan  pengalaman  dalam  bentuk  nominalisasi. 

Pengalihan  pengalaman  dari  proses  menjadi  benda  dalam  nominalisasi  diperlukan 

dalam  teks  sains  karena  sains  berfungsi  membuat  klasifikasi  atas  alam  atau  sosial 

semesta  sebagai  benda  atau  hal  yang  dibendakan  dan  mencari  hubungan 

antarbenda.   

 

Keywords: grammatical metaphor, scientific text 

 

 

1. INTRODUCTION 

congruent  and  marked  or  incongruent  coding. 

  The  congruent  coding  is  also  known  as  a 

Metaphor  is  defined  as  representing  common, usual or literal representation whereas 

meaning  in  or  interpreting  meaning  from  two  the  incongruent  one  is  called  uncommon, 

sides or perspectives (Duranti 1997: 38, 64; Stern  unusual  or  metaphorical  representation.  

2000:  35).  The  term  metaphor  is  constituted  by  Metaphor  divides  into  lexical  and  grammatical 

meta‐  which  means  ‘half’  or  ‘partly’  as  in  metaphor.    Whereas  lexical  metaphor  has  been 

metaphysics  meaning  ‘half‐physical’  or  ‘partially  well‐known for long (Lakoff and Johnson 1980), 

physical’ and phora or phoric meaning ‘referring  grammatical  metaphor  is  relatively  new 

to’ or ‘pointing to’ as in anaphora, cataphora, and  (Halliday  1985).    This  paper  elaborates  both 

exophora  respectively  meaning  ‘pointing  to  the  lexical  and  grammatical  metaphor  and  focuses 

back’,  ‘pointing  to  the  front’,  and  ‘pointing  out  on the use of grammatical metaphor in scientific 

side’.  Thus,  metaphor  implies  representing  or  texts.   

interpreting  meaning  from  two  views;  that  is   

partially  from  one  side  and  partially  from  2. LEXICAL METAPHOR 

another  side.  Metaphor  inherently  implies  two   

points:  comparison  and  uncommon 

Lexically  there  is  a  usual,  common  or 

representation.  Firstly,  a  metaphorical  coding  congruent  coding  of  meaning  in  language.  

involves  a  comparison  with  an  emphasis  on  Congruently,  the  word  snake  in  the  clause  the 

similarity,  such  as  the  expression  of  the  door  of  snake is crawling on the grass refers to an ‘animal’ 

his  heart  where  his  heart  is  viewed  as  having  or ‘reptile’. Another way of coding experience is 

similar feature to that of a house in that a house  called  incongruent  or  metaphorical 

has a door and his heart also has one. Secondly,  representation. In the clause don’t trust Jack; he is 

a  metaphor  implies  an  uncommon  way  of  a  snake  the  snake  no  longer  refers  to  a  ‘reptile’.  

coding  experience.  In  systemic  functional  This  is  an  unusual  way  of  coding  experience.  

linguistic  (SFL)  theory  where  language  is  Jack is not a snake; he is a human being but he is 

viewed as a social semiotics, there are two poles  considered as if he were a snake.  It is implicitly 

of  coding  experience:  the  unmarked  or  understood  in  the  metaphorical  representation 

Metaphorical Representations and Scientific Texts (Amrin Saragih)

1

that  Jack  is  compared  with  a  snake  where  some  characteristics  of  snake  are  seen  to  exist  in  Jack.   To exemplify, some features or characteristics of  a  snake  are  (+having  scales),  (+crawling),  (+coiling  its  body),  (+having  fangs),  (+being  poisonous)  and  (having  fangs).  Of  all  these  features  some  are  mapped  on  to  Jack.  In  other  words,  some  characteristics  of  the  snake  apply  to  Jack;  for  example  Jack  has  the  characteristics  of  (+coiling)  other  people  by  using  his  words  and  (+being  poisonous)  in  his  words  or  expressions.    Other  characteristics  of  (‐having  scales),  (‐crawling)  and  (‐having  fangs)  are  not  applicable  to  Jack.  The  metaphorical  clause  of  Jack  is  a  snake  implies  that  Jack  is  like  a  snake,  not  to  be  trusted  and  subtly  cheating  people  (coiling  or  rounding  people)  and  hurting  others  (by his poisonous words).   
Lexical  metaphor  potentially  occurs  in  comparison  in  which  nouns  and  nouns,  nouns  and  verbs,  nouns  and  adjectives,  nouns  and  adverbs  are  compared.  In  addition,  lexical  metaphor may occur in the context of ideology.   
Lexical  metaphor  is  realized  by  a  noun  in  comparison  with  another.    In  the  clause  we  have  identified the root of the matter; the matter (being a  noun) is compared with the root (another noun).  The  root  is  deep  under  ground  as  the  basis  of  a  tree. Thus, the root of the matter implies ‘the basis  or  cause  of  the  matter’.  In  other  words,  the  root  of  the  matter  means  the  fundamental  cause  of  the  matter.    Some  other  examples  of  lexical  metaphors  are  the  foot  of  the  mountain,  island  of  hope,  door  of  heart,  sea  of  life,  guard  of  revolution,  and taste for music.   
Metaphorical  representations  may  occur  where  a  noun  is  compared  with  a  verb.  In  the  clause  they  sailed  to  their  expectation,  their  expectation is compared with sailed. It appears as  if  their  expectation  was  the  sea  and  they  sailed  through  the  sea.  Other  examples  of  metaphor  with  verbs  compared  with  nouns  are  open  your  heart,  smiling  city,  filling  one’s  life,  escalating  achievement, and rocketing prices.   
Lexical  metaphor  also  forms  with  nouns  compared  with  adjectives.  In  the  clause  he  has  got  a  bright  future,  the  future  is  compared  with  the brightness of the sun. Here, the future (being  noun) is compared with bright (being adjective).  Other  examples  of  metaphoric  representations 

are  the  man  is  still  green  (being  inexperienced),  green revolution, golden age and dark life.   
Lexical  metaphor  may  also  form  in  ideological  contexts  in  which  a  meaning  or  concept  is  one  community  is  analogously  applied  in  another  culture.  The  president  of  the  US (R. Nixon) was once alleged for a scandal of  corruption  known  as  Watergate  scandal.  The  other  president  (Bill  Clinton)  was  also  alleged  for the scandal of Freshwatergate. Since then the  morpheme  gate  was  used  for  any  corruption  scandal.    This  was  later  applied  in  Indonesia  where  President  Abdurahman  Wahid  was  accused  of  Buloggate,  Bruneigate  and  Golkargate  in  which  gate  is  used  to  mark  corruption  scandal.      3. GRAMMATICAL METAPHOR   
Grammatical  metaphor  is  defined  as  relocation or shift of wording the meaning from  its  usual  representation  to  another  unusual  realization.  In  this  sense,  analogously  to  lexical  metaphor  which  is  an  unusual  coding  of  meaning,  grammatical  metaphor  indicates  an  incongruent  wording  of  meaning.  This  is  to  say  that  inherently  there  are  two  kinds  of wording,  namely  congruent  and  incongruent  or  metaphorical one.   
A  congruent  coding  or  wording  indicates  that  reality  is  coded  in  its  usual  or  common  realizations.  In  other  words,  congruent  representation  is  the  common  way  of  realizing  semantics in grammar; specifically usual ways of  expressing  meaning  in  lexicogrammatical  aspects.    This  is  also  called  literal  meaning.  For  example,  lexico‐grammatically  a  thing  is  congruently  coded  by  noun  and  activity  or  event  by  verb.    In  the  clause  of  the  man  arrived  late, the group the man is a thing and is coded in  a  noun  and  arrived  is  an  event,  which  is  coded  in  a  verb.    In  Table  1,  based  on  Martin  (1993b:  218),  congruent  coding  of  meaning  is  summarized.   
Incongruent  or  metaphorical  coding  does  not follow the congruent representation.  In other  words,  metaphorical  coding  or  grammatical  metaphor indicates uncommon coding in which  commonality  of  coding  as  summarized  in  Table  1  is  violated.    The  expression  of  the  man’s  late  arrival  in  the  man’s  late  arrival  surprises  us  is  a 

2 ENGLONESIAN: Jurnal Ilmiah Linguistik dan Sastra, Vol. 2 No. 1, Mei  2006: 1 – 11 

metaphorical  wording  since  the  congruent  the job the wording is congruent since it follows 

function of arrive as an event is now recoded in  the  principle  as  summarized  in  Table  1.  

noun.  This indicates that grammatical metaphor  However,  in  his  success  in  the  job  results  in  a 

indicates  relocation  or  shift  of  meaning  strong criticism the nominal group his success is a 

expression from the normal to unusual one.   

metaphorical  wording.    The  range  of 

When  a  text  is  not  congruent  in  its  grammatical metaphor is summarized in Table 2 

realization  or  the  literal  realization  is  violated,  in which the sign means                   ‘realized by’. 

grammatical  metaphor  forms.    In  he  succeeded  in 

  Table 1: Congruent Wordings of Meaning 

Meaning 

Realized by 

Lexicogrammar  (Wording)

Examples 

thing 

 

  

activity 

 

  

quality 

 

  

location,  time,   

manner     relation 

       

Participant/noun

The book was sold. 

Process/verb

We ran.

Attribute/adjective The house is old.

Circumstance/adverb He wrote the letter neatly.  The man is in the room.   

conjunction

She was absent because she was ill.

position    judgment,  opinion,  comment 

preposition modality

The post office is near the bank.   
She may arrive early.    I must go now.    I will write a report.   

    Table 2: Metaphorical Coding 

No.  Class Metaphor  1  adjective → noun 

Function Metaphor quality → thing

Examples
unstable → instability  probable → probability 

2a  verb → noun

process → thing

transform → transformation  succeed → success 

2b  tense/phase verb (adverb)  aspect  of  process  → going to/try → prospect/attempt 

→ noun 

thing 

have completed → solution 

2c  modality  verb  (adverb)  modality  of  process  can, could → possibility, potential

→ noun 

→ thing 

is required to go → duty 

2d  verb + adverb/prep. phr.  process 

→ noun 

+circumstance 

thing 

move in circle →revolution;  →  behave badly → misconduct 
 

3  preposition → noun 

minor  process  → with → accompaniment 

thing 

so → effect 

4  conjunction → verb 

relator → thing

so → cause; proof  if → condition

Metaphorical Representations and Scientific Texts (Amrin Saragih)

3

No.  Class Metaphor 

Function Metaphor Examples

5a  noun  head  →  noun  thing  → class  (of  engine [fails] → engine [failure] 

premodifier 

things) 

 

5b  noun  head  →  prep.  thing → possessor phrase postmodifier 

glass [fractures] → [the fracture] of  glass  village [develop] [the development]  of village 

5c  noun head → possessive  thing  → possessor  government [decided] → 

determiner 

(of thing) 

government’s [decision] 

6a  verb → adjective 

process → quality

[poverty] is increasing → increasing [poverty] 

6b  tense/phase 

verb  aspect  of  process  → was absent → being absent 

(adverb) → adjective 

quality 

begin → initial 

6c  modality  verb  →  modality  of  process  always, will → constant 

(adverb) → adjective 

→ quality 

 

7a  adverb → adjective 

manner circumstance  [acted] brilliantly → brilliant 

→ quality 

[acting] 

7b  prepositional  phrase  →  circumstance 

adjective 

quality 

→ [argued] for a long time → lengthy 
[argument]  [describe] in details →detailed 
[description] 

7c  prepositional  phrase  →  circumstance → class  [cracks] on the surface → surface 

noun premodifier 

(of thing) 

[cracks]  [tea] in the morning → morning [tea] 

8  conjunction → adjective  relator → quality

before → previous  and →additional  

9  be/go  +  preposition  →  circumstance 

verb 

process 

→ be about → concern  be instead of → replace 

10  conjunction → verb 

relator → process

and → complement; then → follow;  so → lead to 

11  conjunction 

→  relator 

prepositional phrase 

circumstance 

→ so → as a result therefore → as a consequence 

12a  Φ → verb [in env. 1—4]  Φ → process

[impact] → have [an impact]  [press] → apply [pressure] 

12b  causative vrb → verb [in  agency → process env. 1—4] 

make [conform] → impose 
[conformity on]  let [release] → allow [departure] 

13  Φ  →  noun  [in  env.  Φ → thing

[her success] → the fact of [her 

4 ENGLONESIAN: Jurnal Ilmiah Linguistik dan Sastra, Vol. 2 No. 1, Mei  2006: 1 – 11 

No.  Class Metaphor 

Function Metaphor Examples

Projection] 

success] [my apology] → the act of [my 

apology]

The  change  or  shift  of  coding  from  the 

Grammatical  metaphor  involves  rankshift 

congruent to metaphorical representation causes  of  two  kinds:  downgrading  and  upgrading. 

a  tension  between  semantics  and  grammar.  For  Rankshift  of  downgrading  occurs  in  situations 

example,  in  (1a)  the  clause  complex  of  Ali  was  where  meaning  normally  or  congruently 

absent because he was ill is a normal or congruent  expressed in a clause is metaphorically coded in 

coding in which, as stated in Table 1, relation of  group.  As  a  consequence  of  group/phrase 

‘cause—effect’  is  coded  by  conjunction  because.   downgrading, clause complexes are recoded in a 

In  addition,  quality  is  coded  by  adjectives  of  single  clause.  Where  meaning  is  normally 

absent and ill.  However, in (1b, c, d, e) there is a  expressed  in  groups/phrases,  it  is  now  recoded 

shift  in  which  relation  is  recoded  in  verb  and  in  words  and  that  in  words  is  realized  in 

quality  is  recoded  in  nouns.    The  quality  or  morpheme.  In  Table  3  below  two  types  of 

attribute  absent  and  ill  are  metaphorically  representation:  literal  or  congruent  and 

recoded as being absent and being ill in (1b).  The  metaphorical are given.   

text  in  (1b)  sounds  unnatural;  however,  texts  in 

Rankshift  of  upgrading  is  the  opposite.  

(1,  c,  d,  e)  are  much  more  natural  in  which  Where a meaning is congruently realized in the 

absence and illness are used.   

lower  unit,  metaphorically  it  is  recoded  in  the 

  higher  units.    Specifically,  the  meaning  of  a 

(1)  morpheme is recoded in words that of a word in 

a. Ali is absent because he was ill.   

group/phrase  that  of  a  group/  phrase  in  clause, 

b. Ali’s  being  absent  was  caused  by  his  and that of a clause in clause complex. In many 

being ill.   

cases the rankshift is not gradual, where a word 

c. Ali’s absence is caused by his illness.   

is recoded in clause leaving the group/phrase as 

d. Ali’s absence was due to his illness. 

an  intermedia  unit.  Thus,  rather  than  he  must  be 

e. Ali’s absence was a consequence of his  there,  the  expression  is  recoded  in  I  believe  he  is 

illness.   

there,  it  is  certain  he  is  there  or  there  is  a  strong 

  evidence that he is there in which the modality of 

4. RANKSHIFT 

must  is  represented  in  a  clause.    This  mode  of 

  metaphorical  coding  typically  occurs  in 

Rankshift  is  the  change  in  the  ranking  or  diplomacy, bureaucracy and administration and 

level  of  coding  from  a  higher  level  to  a  lower  this is not further elaborated in this paper. 

one. This is known as down grading of meaning 

As  shown  in  Table  3,  by  applying 

representation. In English grammatical units, from  grammatical metaphor a clause complex of two 

the highest to the lowest one, are constituted by  clauses  or  more  in  their  literal  representations 

four categories, namely: 

can  be  reduced  or  condensed  into  a  single 

  simple clause in its metaphorical representation. 

1. CLAUSE, 

For  example,  the  text  in  row  e  of  Table  3  shows 

2. GROUP/PHRASE, 

that  seven  clauses  are  condensed  into  a  single 

3. WORD, and 

clause. This is the strength of metaphor and this 

4. MORPHEME.   

makes  the  clause  complex  practical  I  the  sense 

  that  rather  than  coding  experience  in  a  number 

The relation is that of constituency where a  of  caluses  they  can  be  coded  in  a  single  simple 

unit is constituted by the immediate unit below  cause. The condensation of meaning is inherent 

it.    Thus,  a  clause  is  constituted  by  in science since such condensation fits scientific 

groups/phrases,  a  group/phrase  consist  of  features.   

words  and  a  word  is  made  is  comprised  of 

morphemes.   

Metaphorical Representations and Scientific Texts (Amrin Saragih)

5

     
a  1. 2.
b  1. 2.
3.
  c 
1.
2. 3. 4.
d  1. 2. 3.
4. 5.   e  1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.    

Table 3: Literal and Metaphorical Representations 

Literal Representation 

Metaphorical Representation 



he was absent  

1. his  being  absent  was  caused  by  his 

because he was ill 

being ill. 

2. his  absence  was  caused  by  his 

illness. 

3. his absence due to his illness. 

4. his absence was a consequence of his 

illness.   

 



the doctor advised 

the  doctor’s  advice  for  the  patient’s  one‐

that  the  patient  should  stay  in  a 

month  stay  in  a  peaceful  place  is  meant 

peaceful place for one month 

for  a  probability  of  cure  for  her  mental 

by  which  her  mental  stress  can  be 

stress.   

cured.   



Indonesia  has  successfully  developed 

1. Indonesia’s  1980’s  successful 

its economy in 1980’s  

economic  development  resulted  in 

which affected the people 

social  effect  of  modern  ways  of  life 

who live in the rural areas 

in rural areas.   

to live in modern ways.   

2. social  effects  of  Indonesia’s  1980’s 

successful  economic  development 

resulted  in  modern  ways  of  life  in 

the rural communities.  

 



our campus is green and large  

the  greenness,  largeness  and  its  distance 

and is distant from the city centre  

from  the  city  centre  are  provisions  for 

which  has  provided  us  with  a 

natural  environment  study  and  a 

natural environment  

comfort of wander.   

to study  

and to hang around comfortably.   

you may leave now  since you have completed the work  but you must return  if I call you  when I need you   to help me   to reshelf the books 

e  your  leave  on  completion  of  work  is  followed  by  an  obligatory  return  on  my  call upon assistance for the book reshelf  

6 ENGLONESIAN: Jurnal Ilmiah Linguistik dan Sastra, Vol. 2 No. 1, Mei  2006: 1 – 11 

5. CHARACTERISTICS  OF  SCIENTIFIC  TEXTS 
 
A scientific text has a number of features or  characteristics.  Some  features  characterize  scientific texts are: 
  1. Objective,  2. Impersonal,  3. Technical,  4. Practical, and   5. Written Language.    All  of  these  characteristics  find  their  expressions  in  langauge,  particularly  in  lexicogrammatical aspects.   
  5. 1 Objective 
A  concept  or  idea  is  called  objective  when  it  is  perceived  similar  by  all  persons  regardless  of  the  surrounding  elements,  such  as  temporal,  spatial, manner characteristics.  On the contrary,  a  subjective  idea  is  one  which  is  contextually  dependent,  that  is  the  idea  varies  in  terms  of  location and manner.  Subjectivity in language is  coded  by  linguistic  aspects  of  (1)  Mental  Process,  (2)  Epithet,  (3)  Modality,  (4)  Euphemism, and (5) Connotative Meaning.   
1) Mental  Process,  that  is  verbs  coding  cognition,  affection  and  perception,  (such  as  know,  realize,  understand,  feel,  like, love, hate, see, hear…),  
2) Epithet, that is adjectives which accept  intensifier  very  and  degrees  of  comparisons,  (such  as  high,  low,  pretty,  good, …),  
3) Modality  which  codes  assessment,  opinion,  personal  judgments,  (such  as  certain, may, will, can, certain, sometimes,  must…), 
4) Euphemism  (wash  my  hand,  pass  away, ask one’s hand), and 
5) Connotative Meanings.      In  order  to  remain  objective  in  a  scientific  text,  the  use  of  the  five  subjective  elements  should  be  avoided  or  if  not  possible  be  minimized.    Objectivity  and  subjectivity  are  in  contrast  proportion  in  the  sense  that  if  subjectivity  increases,  objectivity  decreases  and  if objectivity increases, subjectivity decreases.   

Occasionally  subjective  assessment  is  used  such as in a scale measuring attitudes.  The term  ‘good’,  ‘better’,  ‘best’  and  ‘excellent’  are  used  after  being  made  objective  by  defining  each  of  the term: being ‘good’ means that almost 8o% of  the case is favorable.        5. 2   Impersonal 
Ideas  or  concepts  in  scientific  texts  are  impersonal  in  the  sense  that  involvement  of  the  writer  of  the  text  typically  coded  as  personal  pronouns  I,  we,  s/he  and  the  writer  is  avoided.   Being  personal  implies  subjectivity.    Thus,  to  maintain  the objectivity  pronouns are  not  used.   However,  personality  is  allowed  only  in  acknowledgement.    To  maintain  impersonality,  clauses in scientific texts are typically realized in  the  passive  voice.    This  is  the  main  reason  for  the  dominant  us  of  passive  voice  in  scientific  texts.   
Another  realization  of  impersonality  is  promoting  the  Value  or  Participant.    In  effect  instead  of  representing  an  arachnid  is  an  invertebrate  animal  having  eight  legs  extending  an  equal  interval  from  the  central  body  (Trimble  1985:  80),  the  clause  an  invertebrate  animal  having  eight  legs  extending  an  equal  interval  from  the  central  body  is  called  an  arachnid  or  an  alternative  of  a  meteorological  instrument  that  is  used  to  measure  the  seed  of  the  wind  is  called  an  anemometer  for an  anemometer  is  a  meteorological  instrument  that  is  used to measure the seed of the wind.  In Indonesian  the  use  of  quasi  passive  clause  such as buku  itu  mereka  ambil  is  one  alternative  of  coding  impersonality  for  its  active  counterpart  mereka  mengambil  buku  itu.    This  way  of  promoting  Value  in  relational  process  clause  is  also  the  property of technicality.      5. 3   Technical  
Technicality  refers  to  a  linguistic  form  which  conveys  meanings  of  a  number  of  other  linguistic  forms.    In  other  words,  technicality  contains condensed meaning of words.  There is  no  discipline  or  scientific  study  without  technicality  as  the  terms  used  codes  specificity  in the disciplines. A technical term is constituted  by  three  elements,  namely  (1)  the  term,  (2) 

Metaphorical Representations and Scientific Texts (Amrin Saragih)

7

definition with a (3) process (typically Relational  aspects  of  language  in  which  a  definition  is 

Process)  in  between  the  term  and  definition.   derived.  

The  following  example  shows  the  technical 

 

 

Table 4: Technicality 

  is   

Atom 

refers to 

the smallest element of an entity 

 

points to 

 

Engineering  

is defined as 

the process of harnessing or directing  

 

indicates 

the  forces  and  materials  of  nature  for  the  use  and 

means… 

convenience of man 

Barometer 

  a  meteorological  instrument  used  for  the  measurement 

  of atmospheric pressure 

Precipitation 

All forms of water which fall from the sky 

Token 

Process: Relational 

Values 

Term 

(Verb) 

Definition 

 

Technicality  differs  from  acronym  or  have been recoded in nominal group and logical 

abbreviation  in  that  technicality  involves  relation in verb. 

condensation  of  meaning  whereas  acronym   

covers  contraction  of  form.    A  technical  term  (2) 

may  be  a  common  word  which  carries   

Australia’s  steel‐making  capacity,  and 

condensed  meanings  whereas  acronym  carries  of  demands,  rubber,  metal  goods  and  motor 

common sense in short form.  For example sound  vehicles  enlarged  partly  because  war 

in sound is a compression of wave that can be heard  demanded. 

is  technical  term.    Although  one  knows  in 

a.   Ali was absent because he was ill. 

common  sense  the  meaning  of  sound,  as  a 

b.   The  Dutch  colonized  Indonesia  for 

technical  term  the  word  carries  different 

almost  four  centuries,  which  caused 

meaning.    On  the  other  hand  UFO  is  an 

the people to be poor and ignorance. 

abbreviation of unidentified flying object.  Once  (3) 

the full or complete form is given the meaning is 

a.   The  enlargement  of  Australia’  steel‐

obvious.    However,  it  should  be  noted  that  an 

making  capacity,  and  of  chemicals, 

acronym  may  sometimes  serve  as  a  technical 

rubber,  metal  goods  and  motor 

term.   

vehicles  all  owed  something  to  the 

A  concrete  thing  is  one  which  is 

demands of war. 

identifiable  by  all  senses  (seeing,  hearing, 

b.   Ali’s absence was due to his illness.  

feeling, smelling, tasting…).  In other words, the 

c.   The  Dutch  colonization  in  Indonesia 

more  senses  can  be  used  to  identify  an  object, 

resulted in poverty and ignorance.   

the  more  concrete  the  object  becomes.    On  the   

contrary,  the  less  senses  are  potentially  used  to  5. 4  Practical 

identify  an  object,  the  more  abstract  the  object 

The  practicality  of  scientific  texts  indicates 

becomes.    In  this  way,  water  is  more  concrete  that  words  or  linguistic  resources  used  are 

than air, waterless is more abstract than water and  economical  and  unambiguous.    Specifically  the 

waterlessness  is  more  abstract  than  watery.   coding of propositions or ideas in more than one 

Abstraction,  as  Martin  (1993b:  226)  has  clause is preferred to be represented in a single 

observed,  deals  with  coding  of  meaning  in  clause.  Further, an idea or proposition coded in 

nominal group rather than in clause and logical  a  single  clause  is  realized  in  a  group  or  phrase 

relation  meaning  is  buried  in  process.    To  by which less linguistic resources are employed.   

exemplify,  the  text  in  (1)  is  concrete  or  much 

A  relationship  of  constituent  is  formed 

more  concrete  than  that  in  (2)  where  clauses  among  the  units.    This  is  to  say  that  a  higher 

8 ENGLONESIAN: Jurnal Ilmiah Linguistik dan Sastra, Vol. 2 No. 1, Mei  2006: 1 – 11 

unit  is  constituted  by  the  lower  one.    Thus,  a  functional  elements  of  Deictic  Λ  Numerative  Λ 

clause  is  constituted  by  group/phrase  which  Epithet Λ Classifier Λ Thing Λ Qualifier (where 

made  up  of  words  and  a  word  is  comprised  of  Λ means ‘followed by’) as shown in (4) below. 

morphemes.  A  group  experientially  consists  of 



Deictic  Numerative  Epithet  Classifier Thing

Qualifier

the   three 

young 

Asian 

women 

in the room 

the   three 

young 

Asian 

women 

who stay in the room 

the actual  first three  pretty young  south east Asian  women  who stay in the room 

 

 

Table 5: Spoken and Written Language 

 

Spoken Language

Written Language 

Medium 

sounds (phonemes) 

scripts/letters (grapheme) 

Lexicogrammar 

high GI 

ow GI 

low LD 

high LD 

  Coding  propositions  of  three  clause  into  a  single  clause  has  downgraded  or  rankshifted  representation  in  which  a  clause  is  coded  in  elements  of  group  as  sown  in  more  than  clause  such as in (5).      (5)  d.   Ali  arrived  late,  which  worried  us  but 
pleased our rival team.    e.   Ali’s late arrival resulted in our worries 
and our rival team’s pleasure.     
It  is  worth  noting  that  practicality  is  paradoxical  to  ambiguity  in  the  sense  that  the  increase  of  practicality  i.  e  economizing  linguistic  resources  is  potential  to  increase  ambiguity.    To  exemplify,  the  following  clause  in  (6a)  is  ambiguous.    The  ambiguity  can  be  avoided by specifying the case, thus resulting in  impracticality  of  the  text,  i.  e  using  more  linguistic resources.      (6) 
a.   Flying  planes  can  be  dangerous  (ambiguous).   
b.   Planes  which  are  flying  can  b  dangerous (impractical).  
c.   The  act  of  flying  planes  can  be  dangerous (impractical).   
     

5. 5 Written Language  Scientific texts are coded in the grammar of 
written  language.    Written  language  differs  from  spoken  language  not  merely  in  terms  of  medium  in  the  sense  that  spoken  language  is  coded  in  or  realized  by  sounds  (phonemes)  and  that  written  language  is  coded  in  scripts  (grapheme)  but  also  in  lexicogrammatical  aspects.    Precisely,  this  is  to  say  that  the  lexicogrammatical  representation  of  spoken  language differ from that of written language.   
It  is  specified  that  spoken  language  has  high  grammatical  intricacy  (GI)  and  low  lexical  density  (LD)  whereas  written  language  has  low  GI  and  low  LD.    GI  refers  the  number  of  clause  in  a  sentence  or  clause  complex  (in  LFS  terminology).    The  more  clauses  in  a  clause  complex  the  more  intricate  or  the  higher  the  GI  becomes.  Thus, he was absent because he was ill is  more  complex  than  his  absence  was  caused  by  his  illness for in the latter clause the propositions are  coded  in  a  single  clause.    LD  describes  number  of  content  words  (Noun,  Verb,  Adjective  and  Adverb)  per  clause.    Thus,  the  clause  he  was  absent has one LD and he was ill is also has one.   The  LD  of  a  sentence  or  clause  complex  is  the  sum  of  all  lexical  items,  i.  e  content  words  divided  by  the  number  of  clauses.    To  exemplify,  the  clause  complex  of  Ali  arrived  late, which worried us but pleased our rival team  is  constituted  by  3  clauses  and  7  lexical  item  (printed  in  bold  letters).    The  LD  is  7/3  which 

Metaphorical Representations and Scientific Texts (Amrin Saragih)

9

gives  2.3  or  simply  2.    By  the  same  way,  the  whereas  written  language  is  related  to  the 

clause  Ali’s  late  arrival  resulted  in  our  worries  language  of  science  and  technology.  The 

and  our  rival  team’s  pleasure  which  is  a  single  difference  of  spoken  language  from  written 

clause has LD of 8.   

language is specified as the following. 

Spoken  language  is  related  to  general   

language  or  the  language  of  common  sense 

Table 6: Lexicogrammar and Medium in Language 

Lexicogrammar 

Medium 

Examples

spoken 

spoken 

spoken in spoken: conversation 

spoken 

written 

spoken in written: dialogues in novel 

written 

spoken 

written in spoken: news on TV 

written 

written 

written in written: scientific texts 

 

The derivation of metaphorical representation in 2b is configured as in Figure 1 

 

 

  land clearing for crop cultivation  results in forest d estruction and natural resourse devastation 

 

 

People clear land  in  order  to  cultivate crops 

  which destructs    millions forests    and devastates 
  natural resources 

 

 

Figure 1: Derivation of Metaphorical Representation 

 

By  cross  classifying  lexicogrammar  and  Thus,  objectivity,  impersonality,  echnicality, 

medium  as  features  of  spoken  and  written  practicality  and  written  mode  as  features  of 

language, the characteristic of a scientific text is  science  are  maintained  by  the  use  of 

derived  as  written  (lexicogramar)  in  written  grammatical  metaphor.    This  is  one  of  the 

(medium) as summarized in Table 6. 

reasons  for  the  use  of  grammatical  metaphor  in 

  scientific texts.   

6. METAPHORICAL  CODING  IN 

 

SCIENTIFIC TEXTS 

 

  Another  advantage  of  grammatical 

Metaphorical  coding  complies  with  metaphor is that it can ‘bury’ material processes 

features of scientific text. With its characteristics  in  nominnalization,  thus  tranforming  processes 

of  being  objective,  impersonal,  technical,  into thing.  Once the thing exists, then it can be 

practical/abstract  and  written  language,  a  related to another or other phenomena.  Science 

scientific  text  turns  common  sense  or  daily  functions to describe the relation of a variable or 

experience into object or thing.  In other words,  phenomenon to another or others.  As shown in 

grammatical  metaphor  turns  process  into  thing  (7a)  the  congruent  text  is  constituted  by  four 

or  object.    Once  an  object  forms,  a  scienctist  clauses.    The  congruent  coding  in  clause 

finds  or  describes  the  relation  of  the  object  to  complex  with  four  material  processes  (clear, 

another.    It  is  a  fact  that  scientists  are  in  search  cultivate, destroy and devastate) are buried in two 

of  relations  in  the  natural  or  social  settings.   nominal  groups  or  nominalizations  of  land 

10 ENGLONESIAN: Jurnal Ilmiah Linguistik dan Sastra, Vol. 2 No. 1, Mei  2006: 1 – 11 

clearing  for  crop  cultivation  and  forest  destruction  and  natural  resource  devastation.    A  relational  process  of  results  in  is  used  to  relate  the  two  nominalizations.    The  core  meaning  of  the  simple clause in 7b is ‘a result in b’.      (7) 
a.   People  clear  land  in  order  to  cultivate  crops,  which  destructs  forest  and  devastate natural resources.   
b.   Land  clearing  for  crop  cultivation  results in forest destruction and natural  resource devastation.   
    7. CONCLUSIONS    Metaphorical  representation  indicates  an  uncommon  or  incongruent  coding  of  experience.    Metaphor  divides  into  lexical  and  grammatical  metaphor.    In  grammatical  metaphor  one  codes  experience  in  incongruent  way,  that  is  in  violation  of  common  coding  as  summarized in Table 1.  The use of grammatical  metaphor  offers  two  advantages.    Firstly,  grammatical  metaphor  reduces  or  condenses  a  clause complex into a single clause.  This results  in  practicality  of  expression  in  which  processes  are  relocated  as  things  in  nominalizations.   Secondly,  grammatical  metaphor  buries  material  and  other  types  of  processes  in  nominalizaztion and provides relational process  to  indicate  relations  between  or  among  things.   By  the  two  uses,  grammatical  metaphor  is  a  powerful  tool  in  turning  texts  of  common  sense  experience into scientific texts.   
             

REFERENCES 
 
Duranti,  A.  1997.  Linguistic  Anthropology.   Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.   
Halliday,  M.A.K.  1994.  An  Introduction  to  Functional  Grammar.  First  Edition  London:  Edward Arnold.   
Halliday,  M.A.K.  1994.  An  Introduction  to  Functional  Grammar.  Second  Edition  London: Edward Arnold.   
Halliday,  M.A.K.  and  Ch.  M.I.M.  Matthiessen  2001.Construing Experience through Meaning:  a  Language‐based  Approach  to  Cognition.  London: continuum.   
Lakoff, G. and M. Johnson.  1980.  Metaphors We  Live  By.    Chicago:  University  of  Chicago  Press.   
Martin,  J.  R.  1992.  English  Text:  System  and  Structure. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. 
Martin, J. R. 1993a. Literacy in Science: Learning  to  Handle  Texts  as  Technology.  In  Halliday,  M.  A.  K.  dan  J.  R.  Martin  (eds.)  Writing  Science:  Literacy  and  Discursive  Power.  London:  The  Falmer  Press,  pp.  166—202.   
Martin,  J.  R.  1993b.  Technicality  and  Abstraction:  Language  for  the  Creation  of  Specialized  Texts.    In  Halliday,  M.  A.  K.  dan  J.  R.  Martin  (eds.)  Writing  Science:  Literacy  and  Discursive  Power.  London:  The  Falmer Press, pp. 203—220.   
Trimble,  L.  1985.  English  for  Science  and  Technology: a discourse approach.  Cambridge:  Cambridge University Press.   
Stern,  J.  2000.  Metaphor  in  Context.    Cambridge:  The MIT Press.   
Tucker,  G.  H.  1998.  The  Lexicogrammar  of  Adjectives:  A  Systemic  Functional  Approach  to  Lexis.  London:  Cassell.  

Metaphorical Representations and Scientific Texts (Amrin Saragih)

11

Dokumen baru

PENGARUH PENERAPAN MODEL DISKUSI TERHADAP KEMAMPUAN TES LISAN SISWA PADA MATA PELAJARAN ALQUR’AN HADIS DI MADRASAH TSANAWIYAH NEGERI TUNGGANGRI KALIDAWIR TULUNGAGUNG Institutional Repository of IAIN Tulungagung

119 3984 16

PENGARUH PENERAPAN MODEL DISKUSI TERHADAP KEMAMPUAN TES LISAN SISWA PADA MATA PELAJARAN ALQUR’AN HADIS DI MADRASAH TSANAWIYAH NEGERI TUNGGANGRI KALIDAWIR TULUNGAGUNG Institutional Repository of IAIN Tulungagung

40 1057 43

PENGARUH PENERAPAN MODEL DISKUSI TERHADAP KEMAMPUAN TES LISAN SISWA PADA MATA PELAJARAN ALQUR’AN HADIS DI MADRASAH TSANAWIYAH NEGERI TUNGGANGRI KALIDAWIR TULUNGAGUNG Institutional Repository of IAIN Tulungagung

40 945 23

PENGARUH PENERAPAN MODEL DISKUSI TERHADAP KEMAMPUAN TES LISAN SISWA PADA MATA PELAJARAN ALQUR’AN HADIS DI MADRASAH TSANAWIYAH NEGERI TUNGGANGRI KALIDAWIR TULUNGAGUNG Institutional Repository of IAIN Tulungagung

21 632 24

PENGARUH PENERAPAN MODEL DISKUSI TERHADAP KEMAMPUAN TES LISAN SISWA PADA MATA PELAJARAN ALQUR’AN HADIS DI MADRASAH TSANAWIYAH NEGERI TUNGGANGRI KALIDAWIR TULUNGAGUNG Institutional Repository of IAIN Tulungagung

28 790 23

KREATIVITAS GURU DALAM MENGGUNAKAN SUMBER BELAJAR UNTUK MENINGKATKAN KUALITAS PEMBELAJARAN PENDIDIKAN AGAMA ISLAM DI SMPN 2 NGANTRU TULUNGAGUNG Institutional Repository of IAIN Tulungagung

60 1348 14

KREATIVITAS GURU DALAM MENGGUNAKAN SUMBER BELAJAR UNTUK MENINGKATKAN KUALITAS PEMBELAJARAN PENDIDIKAN AGAMA ISLAM DI SMPN 2 NGANTRU TULUNGAGUNG Institutional Repository of IAIN Tulungagung

66 1253 50

KREATIVITAS GURU DALAM MENGGUNAKAN SUMBER BELAJAR UNTUK MENINGKATKAN KUALITAS PEMBELAJARAN PENDIDIKAN AGAMA ISLAM DI SMPN 2 NGANTRU TULUNGAGUNG Institutional Repository of IAIN Tulungagung

20 825 17

KREATIVITAS GURU DALAM MENGGUNAKAN SUMBER BELAJAR UNTUK MENINGKATKAN KUALITAS PEMBELAJARAN PENDIDIKAN AGAMA ISLAM DI SMPN 2 NGANTRU TULUNGAGUNG Institutional Repository of IAIN Tulungagung

32 1111 30

KREATIVITAS GURU DALAM MENGGUNAKAN SUMBER BELAJAR UNTUK MENINGKATKAN KUALITAS PEMBELAJARAN PENDIDIKAN AGAMA ISLAM DI SMPN 2 NGANTRU TULUNGAGUNG Institutional Repository of IAIN Tulungagung

41 1350 23